How to memorize anything by Chunking

I got this method straight out of the fantastic book A Mind for Numbers by Barbara Oakley.

What are Chunks? Chunks are pieces of information bound together by meaning.

What can I use Chunking for? You can use is for everything that requires remembering information be it names, a certain school subject, history, dates, etc.

How it works:

1. The first step in chunking, then, is to simply focus your attention on the information you want to chunk. If you have the television going in the background, or you’re looking up every few minutes to check or answer your phone or computer messages, it means that you’re going to have difficulty making a chunk, because your brain is not really focusing on the chunking. When you first begin to learn something, you are making new neural patterns and connecting them with preexisting patterns that are spread through many areas of the brain. Your octopus tentacles can’t make connections very well if some of them are off on other thoughts.

2. The second step in chunking is to understand the basic idea you are trying to chunk, whether it is understanding a concept such as continental drift, the idea that force is proportional to mass, the economic principle of supply and demand, or a particular type of math problem.

3.The third step to chunking is gaining context so you see not just how, but also when to use this chunk. Context means going beyond the initial problem and seeing more broadly, repeating and practicing with both related and unrelated problems so you see not only when to use the chunk, but when not to use it.

Make it Stick by Peter Brown

Here are the general Notes to the book Make it Stick by Peter Brown, and here are the Principles to learn anything

Learning is deeper and more durable when it’s effortful. Learning that’s easy is like writing in sand, here today and gone tomorrow. We are poor judges of when we are learning well and when we’re not.

If you’re just engaging in mechanical repetition, it’s true, you quickly hit the limit of what you can keep in mind. However, if you practice elaboration, there’s no known limit to how much you can learn. Elaboration is the process of giving new material meaning by expressing it in your own words and connecting it with what you already know. The more you can explain about the way your new learning relates to your prior knowledge, the stronger your grasp of the new learning will be, and the more connections you create that will help you remember it later.

People who learn to extract the key ideas from new material and organize them into a mental model and connect that model to prior knowledge show an advantage in learning complex mastery. A mental model is a mental representation of some external reality.

Fallacies:

  • If they can make learning easier and faster, the learning will be better. Much research turns this belief on its head: when learning is harder, it’s stronger and lasts longer!
  • What is learned through repetition only lasts shortly.
  • Rereading has three strikes against it. It is time consuming. It doesn’t result in durable memory. And it often involves a kind of unwitting self-deception, as growing familiarity with the text comes to feel like mastery of the content. Rising familiarity with a text and fluency in reading it can create an illusion of mastery.

Learning is stronger when it matters, when the abstract is made concrete and personal! Apply what you read about to your life.

Mastery requires both the possession of ready knowledge and the conceptual understanding of how to use it.

One of the most striking research findings is the power of active retrieval—testing—to strengthen memory, and that the more effortful the retrieval, the stronger the benefit. Think quiz versus rereading. The act of retrieving learning from memory has two profound benefits. One, it tells you what you know and don’t know, and therefore where to focus further  improve the areas where you’re weak. Two, recalling what you have learned causes your brain to reconsolidate the memory, which strengthens its connections to what you already know and makes it easier for you to recall in the future. In effect, retrieval—testing—interrupts forgetting.

 Chapter Summaries:
  1. Chapter: Effortful learning changes the brain, building new connections and capability. This single fact—that our intellectual abilities are not fixed from birth but are, to a considerable degree, ours to shape—is a resounding answer to the nagging voice that too often asks us “Why bother?” We make the effort because the effort itself extends the boundaries of our abilities.
  2. Chapter: Sometimes the most powerful feedback for calibrating your sense of what you do and don’t know are the mistakes you make in the field, assuming you survive them and are receptive to the lesson.
  3. Chapter: Structure is all around us and available to us through the poet’s medium of metaphor. A tree, with its roots, trunk, and branches. A river. A village, encompassing streets and blocks, houses and stores and offices. The structure of the village explains how these elements are interconnected so that the village has a life and a significance that would not exist if these elements were scattered randomly across an empty landscape. By abstracting the underlying rules and piecing them into a structure, you go for more than knowledge. You go for knowhow. And that kind of mastery will put you ahead.
  4. Chapter: Learning is at least a three-step process:
    1. initial encoding of information is held in short-term working memory before being consolidated into a cohesive representation of knowledge in long-term memory.
    2. Consolidation reorganizes and stabilizes memory traces, gives them meaning, and makes connections to past experiences and to other knowledge already stored in long-term memory.
    3. Retrieval updates learning and enables you to apply it when you need it. Retrieval practice that’s easy does little to strengthen learning; the more difficult the practice, the greater the benefit.
    4. Learning always builds on a store of prior knowledge. We interpret and remember events by building connections to what we already know. Long-term memory capacity is virtually limitless: the more you know, the more possible connections you have for adding new knowledge.
    5. Trying to come up with an answer rather than having it presented to you, or trying to solve a problem before being shown the solution, leads to better learning and longer retention of the correct answer or solution, even when your attempted response is wrong, so long as corrective feedback is provided.
  5. Chapter: interweaving two or more subjects during practice also provides a form of spacing. interweaving can also help you develop your ability to discriminate later between different kinds of problems and select the right tool from your growing toolkit of solutions. In interweaving, you don’t move from a complete practice set of one topic to go to another. You switch before each practice is complete.

The Most Effective Ways to Study !

I recently read the book Make it Stick by Peter C. Brown  which is about strategies that actually work for learning, these are  applicable not only for students but for everybody that want’s to learn anything new. These are for the most part direct quotes from the book!

Strategies:

1.Practice Retrieving New Learning from Memory:
“Retrieval practice” means self-quizzing. Retrieving knowledge and skill from memory should become your primary study strategy in place of rereading. How to use retrieval practice as a study strategy: When you read a text or study lecture notes, pause periodically to ask yourself questions like these, without looking in the text: What are the key ideas? What terms or ideas are new to me? How would I define them? How do the ideas relate to what I already know?

Generating questions for yourself and writing down the answers is also a good way to study. Set aside a little time every week throughout the semester to quiz yourself on the material in a course, both the current week’s work and material covered in prior weeks. When you quiz yourself, check your answers to make sure that your judgments of what you know and don’t know are accurate. Use quizzing to identify areas of weak mastery, and focus your studying to make them strong.

The harder it is for you to recall new learning from memory, the greater the benefit of doing so. But what you don’t sense when you’re struggling to retrieve new learning is the fact that every time you work hard to recall a memory, you actually strengthen it.

2.Space Out Your Retrieval Practice
Spaced practice means studying information more than once but leaving considerable time between practice sessions. How to use spaced practice as a study strategy: Establish a schedule of self-quizzing that allows time to elapse between study sessions. How much time? It depends on the material. If you are learning a set of names and faces, you will need to review them within a few minutes of your first encounter, because these associations are forgotten quickly. New material in a text may need to be revisited within a day.

3.Interleave the Study of Different Problem Types
What does this mean? If you’re trying to learn mathematical formulas, study more than one type at a time, so that you are alternating between different problems that call for different solutions.

Mix in the practice of other subjects, other skills, constantly challenging your ability to recognize the problem type and select the right solution.

4.ELABORATION

Elaboration is the process of finding additional layers of meaning in new material. For instance: Examples include relating the material to what you already know, explaining it to somebody else in your own words, or explaining how it relates to your life outside of class. A powerful form of elaboration is to discover a metaphor or visual image for the new material. For example, to better grasp the principles of angular momentum in physics, visualize how a figure skater’s rotation speeds up as her arms are drawn into her body.

5.GENERATION
Generation is an attempt to answer a question or solve a problem before being shown the answer or the solution. For instance: On a small level, the act of filling in a missing word in a text (that is, generating the word yourself rather than having it supplied by the writer) results in better learning and memory of the text than simply reading a complete text.

Many people perceive their learning is most effective when it is experiential—that is, learning by doing rather than by reading a text or hearing a lecture.

6. REFLECTION
is a combination of retrieval practice and elaboration that adds layers to learning and strengthens skills. What is it? Reflection is the act of taking a few minutes to review what has been learned in a recent class or experience and asking yourself questions. What went well? What could have gone better? What other knowledge or experiences does it remind you of?

7. CALIBRATION
is the act of aligning your judgments of what you know and don’t know with objective feedback so as to avoid being carried off by the illusions.

Calibration is simply the act of using an objective instrument to clear away illusions and adjust your judgment to better reflect reality. The aim is to be sure that your sense of what you know and can do is accurate.

 

I highly recommend reading this book if you are serious about learning something new from books specifically. You can buy it here.