The Little Book of Talent by Daniel Coyle, Book Notes

I recently read this book and here are the notes I took from it. The main message is: Talent great but success comes never without hard work and hours and hours of practice. There is no easy route to mastery.

When you steal, focus on specifics, not general impressions. Capture concrete facts: the angle of a golfer’s left elbow at the top of the backswing

 

When “stealing” from somebody else:
• What, exactly, are the critical moves here? • How do they perform those moves differently than I do?

Have a daily performance journal

BEFORE YOU START, FIGURE OUT IF IT’S A HARD SKILL OR A SOFT SKILL

HARD, HIGH-PRECISION SKILLS are actions that are performed as correctly and consistently as possible, every time
(Math, CoD, Driving)

SOFT, HIGH-FLEXIBILITY SKILLS , on the other hand, are those that have many paths to a good result, not just one.
(Sales, Mma)

Soft skills are about the three Rs: Reading, Recognizing, and Reacting.

Is a teacher or coach usually involved in the early stages? If the answer is yes, then it’s likely a hard skill.

When you learn hard skills, be precise and measured. Go slowly.

soft skills are built by playing and exploring inside challenging, ever-changing environments. Aggressive, curious, and experimental, always seeking new ways to challenge yourself.

Prioritize the hard skills because in the long run they’re more important to your talent.

 

Find the Sweet Spot, Then Reach practice is to reach. This means to stretch yourself slightly beyond your current ability, ability, spending time in the zone of difficulty called the sweet spot

Comfort Zone Sensations: Ease, effortlessness. You’re working, but not reaching or struggling. Percentage of Successful Attempts: 80 percent and above.

Sweet Spot] Sensations: Frustration, difficulty, alertness to errors. You’re fully engaged in an intense struggle—as if you’re stretching with all your might for a nearly unreachable goal, brushing it with your fingertips, then reaching again. Percentage of Successful Attempts: 50–80 percent. THIS IS WHERE YOU WANT TO BE

Survival Zone] Sensations: Confusion, desperation. You’re overmatched: scrambling, thrashing, and guessing. You guess right sometimes, but it’s mostly luck. Percentage of Successful Attempts: Below 50 percent.

Albert Einstein said, “One must develop an instinct for what one can just barely achieve through one’s greatest efforts.”

Instead of counting minutes or hours, count reaches and reps.

To begin chunking,
first engrave the blueprint of the skill on your mind (see Tip #2 ). Then ask yourself: 1) What is the smallest single element of this skill that I can master? 2) What other chunks link to that chunk?

EACH DAY, TRY TO BUILD ONE PERFECT CHUNK

CHOOSE FIVE MINUTES A DAY OVER AN HOUR A WEEK of intense Deep Work

0.25 seconds after a mistake is made, in which people do one of two things—they look hard at the mistake or they ignore it.

Develop the habit of attending to your errors right away.

SLOW IT DOWN Super-slow practice works like a magnifying glass: It lets us sense our errors more clearly, and thus fix them.

CLOSE YOUR EYES why practicing to intensivy your focus

Napping is good for the learning brain, because it helps strengthen the connections formed during practice and prepare the brain for the next session,

Learning is reaching . Passively reading a book—a relatively effortless process, letting the words wash over you like a warm bath—doesn’t put you in the sweet spot.

… closing the book and writing a summary forces you to figure out the key points (one set of reaches), process and organize those ideas so they make sense (more reaches), and write them on the page (still more reaches, along with repetition).
The equation is always the same: More reaching equals more learning.

But when it comes to learning, the science is clear: Exhaustion is the enemy.

Embrace Repetition, and Keep Big Goals Secret

FOR EVERY HOUR OF COMPETITION, SPEND FIVE HOURS PRACTICING

 

You can Buy this book here.